Narach Philosophy

THE THEORY AND ITS APPLICATION


If this correctly represents the ancient idea of the cell and its action, we should find the ancient theories of the creation of life to correspond to it too. We shall see in the course of these pages how far this can be proved to be so. Further, if the idea of the gods of the Vedas is based on the development of the cell through its different stages, we should be able to prove this too.

In this connection we should bear in mind that the cell in its first state of equilibrium is conceived as charged with super-electric energy, corresponding to the energy of the human heart, and that the Centrosome has a positive, while the rest of the cell a negative super-electric charge. Hence the Centrosome, or a Vedic god, is regarded as a Purushic or a male creative energy; while the rest of the cell corresponding to which we have the idea of Nature or Prakrti, and which is symbolized as Water in the sacred books of the Hindus is to be understood as a Prakrtic or a female energy. Then we notice that both the Centrosome and the cell-body pass through the same evolution, from positive or negative super-electric energy to heat, electric, and magnetic energy; and so we might say that both Purusha and Prakrti, or God and Nature, as we see them in their manifest forms, are characterised by the same creative energies of life, from super-electric to magnetic.

Then we see that one time it is the Centrosome that acts on the cell, and at another it is the cell that acts on the Centrosome; and so we might conclude that in the creation of life at one time it is Purusha or God (Centrosome) who prevails, and at another it is Nature or Prakrti (cell). But we notice that the final division of the cell takes place when the Centrosome creates not only an induced negative super-electric charge, but also a new magnetic field, complete with its two north and south seeking poles.

Hence we might say that, ultimately, all creation is due to the action of Purusha or God (Centrosome) who creates this physical universe, with Ether, characterised by magnetic energy, as the first of elements, by means of his own inherent power. We, shall presently see how all these ideas, associated with the different stages of cell-development, are personified in the gods of the Vedas, and form the bases of the different systems of Hindu Philosophy.

The Centrosome and Vedic Gods: We have shown that the Centrosome corresponds to the idea of Purusha or the male creative energy, that is, a Vedic god. Again, at the commencement of the action of a new cell, we see that it is characterised by positive super-electric energy. Then at the last stage of the development of the old cell too it possesses the same positive super-electric energy. Now we have shown that Vishnu is the Vedic god characterised by Heart energy as positive, that is, the soul; and so we should be able to show that the Centrosome, at the conclusion of the old and the commencement of the new cell, may be identified with Vishnu as he is described in the Vedas. Then we see how the energy of the Centrosome, when it acts on the cell, is transformed into heat; and we have shown that Agni and Indra are the two Vedic gods characterised by Buddhi, which is identified with Sun-energy or heat.

Hence we should be able to prove that the action of the Centrosome at this stage corresponds to the description of Agni and Indra in the Vedas. Then the heat of the Centrosome is transformed into electric energy; and we have seen that Soma and Rudra are the two Vedic gods who are characterised by Mind energy, which is electric; and so we have to show that the action of the Centrosome at this stage corresponds to the Vedic description of these gods. Finally, the energy of the Centrosome becomes magnetic, and it divides into two; and we have seen that Dyaus and Prthvi and the two Asvins are the two pairs of deities in the Vedas who refer to the twofold character of Ether with two magnetic poles, north and south; and so we have to show that the action of the Centrosome at this stage corresponds to the description of these gods in the Vedas.

The Cell-Body; Vrtra and Varuna: In addition to the male or Purushic aspect of the problem, based on the character of the Centrosome, we have to deal with its Prakrtic or female aspect too; and this, as we have shown, corresponds to the Nucleus or the body of the cell. This again we have identified with Vrtra and Varuna in the Vedas, and we have to show how far their Vedic description agrees with the Nucleus of the cell.

It is only when this is done that we can succeed in establishing that the idea of the gods of the Vedas the same as that of the Centrosome at different stages of the development of the cell; and then we might conclude that, as the cell is a miniature of the whole universe, the gods of the Vedas personify the mighty forces that shape the course of life and destiny of each individual being as well as the whole world.

Then, if we can show that the five great systems of Hindu Philosophy Vedanta, Yoga, Vaisesika, Nyaya and Sankhya are based on the five corresponding creative energies of life the Heart (super-electric energy), Buddhi (heat), Mind (electric energy), and the senses of knowledge and action (twofold character of Ether with its two magnetic poles, north and south) we shall have proved that they are founded on the idea of the different Vedic gods; and so the Vedas will have been shown to be the originals of the great systems of Hindu Philosophy even as tradition claims them to be. It will then be our task to connect the different systems of Hindu Religion.

Vaisnavism, Saivism, Buddhism, and Jainism all that had their birth in India in the past with the idea of the great systems of Hindu Philosophy, from Vedanta to Sankhya; and then, finally, we shall see how the Epic of the Mahabharata is like a coping stone to this mighty edifice fixing and completing the whole in Story-form.