Narach Philosophy

THE CELL AS A PICTURE OF VEDIC GODS


Leaving aside the Centrosome for the present, we see that the Nucleus is the most important part of the cell, and all creative changes, which lead to its development and division, take place in the Nucleus first of all. It may, therefore, be called the most active part of the cell-body, and identified with Prakrti or Nature, the body of the world of life around us; and the word Prakrti itself is derived from Kr, which means "to act". Thus when Brahmanda (universal cell) or the manifest world is conceived as being active in itself, it is called Prakrti; and that, in the minutest form of organic life, corresponds to the Nucleus of the cell.

The Nucleus consists of two parts, one of which is fibrillar, and the other a fluid substance. The former again consists of two parts, one of which does not take a stain, and the other which does. The two main parts of the Nucleus may be identified with Vrtra and Varuna of the Vedas respectively. Vrtra is described as a Serpent because he represents the fibrillar part of the Nucleus which, as we may see in the figure of the cell, assumes a thread-like or a Serpent-like form as soon as the cell becomes active. The colour-taking part of this fibrillar matter may be said to correspond to the spots on the serpent's skin, and these spots are actually seen in the figure of the Nucleus under the microscope.

Varuna may be identified with the fluid part of the Nucleus, and so he is described in the Vedas as the Ocean, the biggest expanse of fluid in the world. Again, we have seen that Water, in all its forms, symbolizes Prakrti or Nature, and we have pointed out that this is because the Nucleus, the miniature of Nature or Prakrti in the cell, consists of a fluid substance.

The Centrosome and Vedic Gods: As the Nucleus may be identified with Vrtra and Varuna in the Vedas, the other principal gods of the Vedas may be identified with the Centrosome at different stages of its action in the development and division of the cell.

We have explained that the Centrosome is the dynamic centre of the cell. It possesses radial energy, characterised by heat and light; it is magnetic in its effect on the cell; and it is its action on the substance of the Nucleus that produces organic changes in the latter, and results in the division of the cell.

Again, we have pointed out that the Centrosome is exactly like the sign of Visarga in Sanskrt grammar, thus, and we have shown that the rules of the latter are so framed that Visarga (Centrosome) is conceived as a Purushic or male energy, characterised by the energy of the Heart, Buddhi, Mind, and the twofold character of Ether with its north and south poles. The principal gods of the Vedas too personify, as we have shown, the same creative energies of life, from the Heart to the twofold character of Ether; and so we might identify them with the Centrosome of the cell at different stages of its development, as it is transformed from one energy into another.

Centrosomes and Chromosomes; Purusha and Prakrti: We have explained that the Chromosomes are the colour-taking particles of the Nucleus; and as the Nucleus has been identified with Nature or Prakrti, the Chromosomes may be identified with it too. Now, as the Centrosome, identified with the gods of the Vedas, .is regarded as a Purushic or male energy, the action of the Centrosomes on the Chromosomes corresponds to that of Purusha on Prakrti, or the male on the female, in the creation of life.

In this connection we have observed that in the action of the Centrosomes on the Chromosomes, the two are arranged like the sign of Anusvara in the Sanskrt alphabet. Thus, again we have explained that, according to the rules of Sanskrt grammar, the Anusvara represents the same five energies as the Visarga, viz., the Heart, Buddhi, Mind, and the twofold character of Ether, corresponding to which we have the senses of knowledge and action. As the Visarga (Centrosome) is Purusha or the universal male energy, and Anusvara represents the union of Purusha and Prakrti Centrosome and Chromosomes), or the universal male and female, it follows that the ancients believed either that each of the two possessed the same creative energies of life, or else that the energy of the one was derived from that of the other; and, when united together, they exhibited the same common energies. We shall see the bearing of this on the idea of the creation of life as understood by the ancients as well as on their different systems of Philosophy.

The Problem: The problem before us is that, assuming that the cell is a miniature of the Universe, can we prove, from a scientific description of the cell on the one hand, and an account of the Hindu gods as given in the Vedas on the other, that the latter personify the form, structure, and development of the cell at different stages of its life? If that can be done, the gods of the Vedas cease to be mere abstractions of ideas, energies, or lines of force. They appear instead as great and living powers that shape an ever changing universe into its different forms all emanating from one source, yet acting in many different ways, now as Heart energy soul, breath, or vital power now as heat, electric or magnetic energy in the womb of Brahmanda or the Cell of the Universe. Then we might show that, as the Vedas are said to be the foundation of all sacred literature of the Hindus, the same thought pervades the Upanishads, Brahmanas, and the different systems of Philosophy and Religion; and the same is rendered in the Mahabharata in story-form.