Narach Philosophy

THE ANCIENT IDEA OF THE CELL


We have observed that all systems of ancient Hindu thought, whatever their method of expression, are based on the idea of the form, structure, development and decay of the organic cell. This implies that the ancients knew all that modern science knows of the cell, and a great deal more besides, for science has yet to solve some of the most intricate problems in connection with the form and functions of the cell. We have shown how the very idea of the Sanskrt language is based on that of the cell; how the ancients knew that it consists of Nucleus and Cytoplasm, Centrosomes and Chromosomes; and the rules of grammar itself are framed to illustrate the process of its development from stage to stage.

All this agrees with what the modern science of Biology has already discovered. But if the ancient theory of the origin and end of life is based on that of the cell, they must have known a great deal more than we do today. Indeed, we might say that they understood the origin of the universe to correspond to the birth of a new cell out of the old, and its death to the latter's disintegration and so we must understand how exactly the old cell is broken into two new ones and then into more and more. Modern science has not yet been able to explain what forces are at work to divide the cell in the last stages of its development; but, if the ancient systems of thought are founded on the working of the cell, the Hindus would appear to have had the following theory in this connection:

(a) We begin our examination of the cell in a state of rest, when the different forces composing it are in equilibrium. The world of manifest life is characterised by super-electric energy, that is electric energy with a very high voltage, and this we have identified with the energy of the Heart. Let us suppose that the cell in its original state of rest is charged with this super-electric, energy, the Centrosome being positively and the rest of the cell, including the Nucleus, negatively charged, and so they balance each other.

(b) This equilibrium is disturbed by the action of the Centrosome on the Nucleus, as a result of which the Nucleolus disappears. This means that the positive super-electric energy of the Centrosome attracts its opposite counterpart in the Nucleus, viz., the Nucleolus, and absorbs it within itself.

(c) As a result of this action the super-electric energy of the Centrosome is transformed into heat.

(d) The Centrosome in this state acts on the Nucleus, still charged with negative super-electric energy, and as a result of this the colour-taking substance of the Nucleus is aggregated and assumes a threadlike or serpent-like form.

(e) As a result of this action, the heat of the Centrosome is transformed into electric energy. The Centrosome, charged with electric energy, continues to act on the Nucleus, and the colour-taking substance is broken into segments or chromosomes, the nuclear membrane disappears, and the whole cell appears a single mass of matter.

(f) As a result of this action, the electric energy of the Centrosome is changed into magnetic energy, with its two poles, north and south; and so the Centrosome divides into two parts corresponding to these magnetic poles.

(g) All the energy of the Centrosome has now been absorbed by the cell, and it cannot act any more. This, however, throws the cell into a violent state of in-equilibrium. The body of the cell is charged with negative super-electric energy, while the Centrosomes are magnetic the two do not balance each other; and, as the Centrosomes cannot act on the cell it is now the turn of the latter to act on the Centrosomes.

(h) The two Centrosomes are magnetic, one having the north and the other the south magnetic pole. They balance each other. But the rest of the cell, charged with negative super-electric energy, remains unbalanced; and so it creates, by induction, a positive super-electric charge to balance its own negative counterpart.

(i) All magnetic energy has power to absorb super-electric energy; and so this induced positive super-electric energy is absorbed by the Centrosomes, and both of them become charged with positive super-electric energy.

(j) The cell, by its action to create an induced super-electric charge, loses its super-electric energy, which is transformed into heat.

(k) The two Centrosomes are each charged with positive super-electric energy (electric energy with a very high voltage), and so they repel each other, and pass on to the two ends of the cell.

(l) The cell, by its action to create an induced positive super-electric charge, has lost its own super-electric energy, which is transformed into heat. It continues to act on the Centrosomes, and its heat is transformed into electric, and then into magnetic energy.

(m) When the Centrosomes became magnetic, they divided one with the north and the other with the south magnetic pole; thereafter they ceased to act on the cell. In the same way, when the cell-body becomes magnetic it ceases to act on the Centrosomes.

(n) The cell has not divided as yet, for, while the Centrosomes repel each other, the two magnetic fields of the cell-body, each with an opposite pole, attract each other. But the whole cell is in a state of great in-equilibrium, for there is nothing to balance the positive super-electric energy of the two Centrosomes, which repel each other.

(o) Equilibrium can be restored only when the Centrosomes create, by induction, a negative super-electric charge, and also, by means of their own power, a new magnetic field, complete with its north and south poles. This is what actually takes place.

(p) We have now two complete halves of the old cell, the two Centrosomes each with a positive super-electric charge, and two magnetic fields with their north and south poles, and they repel each other. This causes the division of the cell.

(q) The induced negative super-electric charge of the Centrosome is absorbed by the magnetic field of each cell. One of the poles becomes the Nucleus, and the other the Cytoplasm; and both are charged with negative super- electric energy. These are the two new cells born out of the old.

(r) It is in this state of equilibrium or rest that we find the new cell before it becomes active once more, the Centrosome being positively and the Nucleus and the Cytoplasm negatively charged with super-electric energy and then again in a new cycle of activity the same thing is repeated without end.