Narach Philosophy

BRAHMANDA AND THE VEDIC GODS: VISHNU AND VAYU


We have examined the Nucleus of the cell and shown that it is represented by Vrtra and Varuna in the Vedas. We have now to examine the character of the Centrosome. In this connection we have observed that the Centrosome, at the commencement of the development of the cell, is characterized by positive super-electric energy. It possesses this energy also at the end of the last stage of the development of the old cell when it divides into its daughter-cells; and as the Centrosome is a miniature of Purusha or the male creative energy, which is God, we might say that He is characterised by this energy both at the commencement and conclusion of the universe, and this positive super-electric energy is the energy of the Soul. In other words God is the universal Soul at the beginning and end of all life; and that is Vishnu as described in the Vedas and later sacred books of the Hindus.

Then we know that Prana or Breath is the vehicle of the soul. Breath is not the element Air, though it partakes of it. It may be described as Air charged with super- electric energy which, in its positive aspect, is the soul, and in its negative the vital seed or semen virile, created out of food transformed into blood. When this Breath passes out of a man, the soul is also said to pass and he dies. Vayu, as described in the Vedas, is this Prana, or Breath conceived as super-electric; and, in terms of the cell, would refer to the Centrosome, charged with positive super-electric energy, but situated in the Nucleus which is negatively super-electric; so that it partakes of both the positive and negative aspects of this super-electric energy.

Thus, Vishnu is the Soul, and Vayu, its vehicle, Prana, and the idea of both corresponds to that of the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy. When, at the commencement of cell development, this Centrosome is situated in the cytoplasm, outside but in the neighbourhood of the Nucleus, it is Vishnu, and when it is situated in the Nucleus, it is the Vayu Centrosome. We shall see in a subsequent chapter how the Vedanta system of Hindu Philosophy is based on this character of the Centrosome acting on the cell both at the beginning and end of its development, and so it has these two deities for its Vedic originals.

We have now to examine the character of Vishnu and Vayu, as described in the Vedas, in relation to the Centrosome of the cell at the commencement of its action.

VISHNU:
VEDIC GODS EXPLANATION THE CELL
Vishnu represents Heart-energy as Purushic, that is, with reference to the Soul. This means that the Centrosome (Vishnu) is to be regarded as characterized by positive super-electric energy at the commencement of cell development. This energy is soon transformed into heat and is, for practical purposes, identified with it. Hence the Centrosome at the commencement of cell action appears to be charged with heat, though it is really super-electric.
In terms of Philosophy this means that the soul (positive super-electric energy) and Buddhi (Sun-energy or heat) may, for practical purposes, be identified.
The Centrosome is characterised by radial energy (heat and light at the commencement of cell action.
Varuna waits on Vishnu. Varuna is the Nucleolus and the fluid part of the Nucleus charged with negative super-electric energy, while Vishnu is the Centrosome charged with its positive counterpart. The former is attracted to the latter and the Nucleolus disappears in the Centrosome. Hence Varuna is said to wait on or follow Vishnu.
We have explained that the negative super- electric energy refers to the vital fluid formed out of food. Hence we may say that food is attracted towards the Soul, which is characterised by positive super-electric energy. In other words, we might say that it is the soul that eats food, even as the Centrosome absorbs the Nucleolus; and in the sacred books we find that Prana or Breath, its vehicle, is said to swallow food. Then God or Purusha is the universal Soul, and Nature or Prakrti his negative counterpart; and the latter is said to be food and the former its eater.
The cell becomes active under the action of the Centrosome on the Nucleus, and then the Nucleolus disappears.
Vishnu is a friend of Indra, and they are wonder workers both. Indra wishes to identify himself with Vishnu, but is persuaded to desist. Vishnu refers to the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy, while Indra is the same Centrosome charged with heat (Buddhi or Sun energy). We have explained that the former is transformed into the latter, and the two are, for practical purposes, alike, though essentially different. Hence Vishnu and Indra, or the two corresponding Centrosomes, are friends and act together. As, for practical purposes, they are alike, Indra wishes to identify himself with Vishnu. But, as the two Centrosomes are not exactly the same, he is persuaded in the end to desist.
In terms of Philosophy, this gives us the connection between the Soul (Vishnu) and Buddhi (Indra), and the two are, for practical purposes, regarded as alike. In the Upanishads, therefore, Indra is identified with the self-conscious soul.
The Centrosome is charged with heat or radial energy.
Vishnu and Indra drink Soma together and slay Vrtra together. Soma refers to Mind or electric energy; and this means that the positive super-electric energy of the Centrosome (Vishnu), associated with heat (Indra), contains within itself (drinks) electric energy (Soma); and we know this to be a physical fact of science in terms of the cell this means that the energy of the Centrosome, originally super-electric, becomes radial, and then electric.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection between the soul (Vishnu), Buddhi (Indra), and the Mind (Soma); and the last is said to be contained within the former two.
Then Vrtra is the fibrillar part of the Nucleus; and the reference to Vishnu and Indra means that the former is broken into segments under the action of the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy (Vishnu) and heat (Indra).
When the cell comes into action, the energy of the Centrosome appears to be radial at first, and then it becomes electric.
The fibrillar, serpent like part of the Nucleus is broken into segments, called Chromosomes, under the action of the Centrosome charged with radial energy.
Vishnu is a bull. The bull or cow, as we have explained, refers to the Purushic aspect of Ether, or magnetic energy with a south-seeking pole, corresponding to which we have the senses of knowledge. This means that the original energy of the (Vishnu) Centrosome becomes magnetic, with a south-seeking pole, in the course of cell development. We have explained how from positive super- electric energy (Vishnu), the Centrosome becomes charged with heat (Indra), and then with electric energy (Soma); and now it is said to become magnetic, with a south-seeking pole (bull). We shall presently see that it is associated with the north-seeking magnetic pole as well; and this completes the course of evolution of the Centrosome.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection of the senses of knowledge with the soul associated with Buddhi and the Mind.
The Centrosome becomes magnetic in the process of cell development, and has its two poles, south-seeking and north-seeking.
Vishnu feeds on clarified butter, and is borne on noble steeds. Clarified butter or Ghee refers to the Prakrtic aspect of Ether, or magnetic energy with a north-seeking pole, corresponding to which we have the senses of action; the idea of steeds is the same. In terms of the cell this means that the Centrosome becomes magnetic in the process of cell development, and has a north-seeking magnetic pole.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection of the senses of action with the soul, associated with Buddhi, Mind, and the senses of knowledge.
The Centrosome becomes magnetic in the process of cell development, and has a north- seeking magnetic pole in addition to a south-seeking one.
The two Asvins wait on Vishnu. The two Asvins, as we have explained, refer to the twofold character of Ether, with its two magnetic poles, corresponding to which we have the senses of knowledge and action. This means that magnetic energy, with its two poles (Asvins) follows the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy (Vishnu). In other words, the Centrosome becomes magnetic in the course of cell development.
In terms of Philosophy this means that both the senses of knowledge and action (Asvins) are associated with the soul (Vishnu). That is to say the soul is characterised not only by knowledge, but by action too. This is the point of view of Vedanta, which has Vishnu for its Vedic original.
The Centrosome which appears to be radial at first, becomes magnetic in the course of cell development, and has its two poles, north-seeking and south-seeking.
Vishnu is seated on the Serpent. The Serpent refers to the serpent-like fibrillar part of the Nucleus, with which Vrtra is identified. This gives us the place of the Vishnu-Centrosome, or the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy, in the cell. It lies over this fibrillar part (Serpent) of the Nucleus, at the commencement of cell action.
Again we notice that at the end of cell action the Centrosome lies over the chromosomes, and the latter are arranged in the form of an arc of a circle. This too may be compared to a serpent which can assume this form. Hence we might say that both at the beginning and end of cell action the Centrosome lies over the serpent-like part of the cell.
In this connection we have observed that the Centrosome, both at the commencement and conclusion of cell action, is charged with positive super-electric energy; that is, it is the Vishnu Centrosome. Hence Vishnu (or Vishnu Centrosome) lies over the Serpent or the serpent-like form of the substance of the Nucleus.
Again, we have explained that the Serpent, in its universal form, refers to the manifest form of the world as it emerges out of Brahmanda, or the Golden Egg, and that is the explanation of Serpent worship among the ancient peoples of the world. We have identified the Serpent with Prakrti or Nature; and in terms of Philosophy this means that Purusha or God lies on Prakrti or Nature, and the whole world is created out of the union of the two.
At the commencement of cell action, the Centrosome is to be found near the Nucleus, and over its fibrillar part. At the end of cell action, just before it divides into two, it is to be found over the chromosomes which are arranged about it in the form of an arc of a circle, thus.
Vishnu is the source of the universe. We have explained that the ancients believed that the old cell divides into two new ones when the Centrosome, charged with positive super-electric energy (Vishnu Centrosome), creates, by induction, its negative counterpart, and also, by its inherent power, a new magnetic field, complete with its two poles. This corresponds to the creation of a new world each time that the old cell divides into two.
In terms of Philosophy this means that God (Vishnu) is the sole creator of the universe, and that is the idea of Vedanta, based on the Vedic conception of Vishnu.
The old or Mother cell divides into two daughter-cells under the action of the Centrosome.
Vishnu is like a cipher. This is exactly the form of the Centrosome in the cell; and so God is often described as a cipher or zero. The Centrosome in the cell is a clear spherical substance, like a point or a cipher.
His effulgence is like the Sun, and its colour is gold. The Sun is characterized by radial energy, heat and light. This means that the Vishnu Centrosome is characterised by this en energy. The idea of gold is the same, and it is said to represent the Sun. We have explained that the Vishnu Centrosome is really charged with positive super-electric energy (Heart-energy or soul), but, for practical purposes, it may be identified with heat; hence Vishnu is corn pared to the Sun, and his colour is said to be gold.
In terms of Philosophy this means that the soul and Buddhi may, for practical purposes, be identified. This has already been explained.
The Centrosome is possessed of radial energy.

Thus we see that Vishnu represents the Centrosome at the first and last stages of cell development, when it is characterised by positive super-electric energy. In his universal form he is the Supreme Soul, Purusha or God at the beginning and end of creation. He creates Prakrti itself, even as the Centrosome projects a magnetic field. As the Centrosome becomes radial, he is compared to the Sun and associated with Buddhi; as it becomes electric, he is associated with the Mind; and as it becomes magnetic, he gives birth to Ether and the other elements, with their properties, and the senses of knowledge and action and so is all life conceived as created by God, the one supreme Purusha in the universe. This is the essential idea of Vedanta, which has Vishnu for its Vedic original.

VAYU: Vayu, as we have explained, is Prana or Breath, the vehicle of the soul, and characterised by super-electric energy, both positive and negative, for with every motion of our breath a small but a most powerful electric current is produced in the cell he is to be identified with the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy, such as it is at the commencement and conclusion of cell development but lying within the Nucleus. The Vishnu Centrosome too is positively super-electric, but it lies outside the Nucleus, whereas the Vayu-Centrosome lies inside the Nucleus; so that it is positively super-electric in virtue of its own character, and negatively so because of its association with the Nucleus.

The idea of Prana or Breath is similar too. It is super-electric inasmuch as with every motion of it a small but powerful current of electricity is produced; and its positive aspect is the soul whose vehicle it is, while its negative aspect is food, blood, or vital seed which corresponds to the liquid of the Nucleus. As air is the element of action, and Vayu is Breath or vital air which is the cause of all animal activity, he is closely associated with action, which forms the basis of the first part of Vedanta, called Purva Mimamsa. Vedanta has thus two Vedic originals, Vayu and Vishnu, corresponding to its two parts, Purva and Uttara Mimamsa, the former dealing with Karma or Action, and the latter with the knowledge of the soul, but both connected together through Prana or Breath, the instrument of action as well as the vehicle of the soul. We shall now see how far the Vedic description of Vayu agrees with that of the Centrosome.

Indeed, the ancient idea is that Nature itself is transformed into the idea of God by means of sacrifice; that is to say, when we believe that Nature acts in accordance with a law that is both good and intelligent, and makes for the well-being of all, we have transformed Nature itself into God, for that is the real idea of God. This, as has already been observed, is illustrated in the story of Sikhandin in the Mahabharata.

VEDIC GODS EXPLANATION THE CELL
Vayu is Prana or vital air; he is Heart or super-electric energy regarded as both positive and negative. We have seen that the Centrosome charged with super-electric energy may lie outside or inside the Nucleus. When it is outside, it is the Vishnu Centrosome; and when it lies inside, it may be identified with the Vayu Centrosome. It is thus positively charged in virtue of its own character, and, negatively so because of its association with the Nucleus. At the beginning of cell development the Centrosome is seen to lie either within the Nucleus or outside in the cytoplasm.
Vayu is a friend of water. Water refers to the watery or fluid part of the Nucleus. This means that the Vayu Centrosome is situated in the fluid part of the Nucleus. This has already been explained.
We have pointed out that Water corresponds to vital seed or blood (food), Vayu is Breath or Prana, and this gives us the connection between Prana and food, and the two are often referred to in the Upanishads and other sacred books. They are said to be two gods; food is said to be grasped and swallowed by breath, the vehicle of the soul and the process of eating food (by Breath) is spoken of as self-sacrifice.
The Centrosome may lie in the fluid part of the Nucleus.
Vayu may be identified with the Atman or soul. Atman or the soul refers to the Centrosome charged with positive super-electric energy. Vayu has been identified with this Centrosome, as we have explained. The Centrosome is charged with positive super-electric energy at the commencement of cell action and it appears to be radial in character.
Vayu is worshipped as Ocean. Water or Ocean refers, as in the case of Varuna, to the Nucleus; and this means that the Vayu Centrosome is closely associated with the Nucleus, and sometimes identified with it. This gives us a further connection between breath (Vayu) and food, blood, or vital seed. Breath, in the Sankhya and some other systems, is regarded as something physical, and not as the vehicle of a spiritual entity, the soul. In that case there would be a close connection between Breath and food (blood or vital seed formed out it), both of them being regarded as charged with negative super-electric energy, and so identified. The Centrosome is situated in the Nucleus, and sometimes it may be said to reside in or arise from the Nucleus.
He lays hold of food. We have pointed out that food is identified with the Nucleus or the cell body; and in terms of the cell this means that the Centrosome lays hold of or acts on the Nucleus.
Again, we have explained that the Centrosome absorbs the Nucleolus at the commencement of cell action; and this would correspond to Vayu or Breath swallowing food.
The Centrosome acts on the Nucleus, and the Nucleolus is then seen to disappear.
He is a friend of Indra. The explanation is the same as in the case of Vishnu's friendship with Indra. In terms of the cell this means that the Centrosome charged with super-electric energy (Vayu) is associated with heat. The Centrosome radial in character.
He slays Vrtra. The explanation is the same as in the case of Vishnu slaying Vrtra. It means that when the Centrosome, charged with super-electric energy (Vayu), acts on the fibrillar, serpent-like part of the Nucleus (Vrtra), and the latter is broken into segments, called the chromosomes. When the Centrosome acts on the Nucleus, its aggregated serpent-like mass is broken into segments called the chromosomes.
He is ever active. This means that the Vayu Centrosome is ever active. It also signifies that Prana or vital breath (Vayu) is ever active and is the cause of all animal activity. It is the action of the Centrosome that causes all development in the cell.
He drinks Soma. The explanation is the same as in the case of Vishnu drinking Soma. In terms of the cell this means that the Vayu Centrosome is associated with electric energy. The Centrosome becomes electric in the process of cell action.
He illumines Heaven and Earth and is associated with cows and horses. The explanation is the same as in the case of Vishnu's association with cows and horses and the two Asvins. We have explained that Heaven and Earth (Dyaus and Prthvi), like the two Asvins, refer to the twofold character of Ether and its two magnetic poles, and so do horses and cows. In terms of the cell it means that the Centrosome becomes magnetic and divides into two halves, each having a magnetic pole. The Centrosome becomes magnetic in the process of cell action, and divides into two.