Narach Philosophy

BRAHMANDA AND THE VEDIC GODS: INDRA AND AGNI


We have seen how the Centrosome is characterised by positive super-electric energy at the commencement of cell action. It acts on the Nucleus, charged with negative super-electric energy, and absorbs the Nucleolus; and the effect of this action is that its super-electric energy is transformed into heat. The Centrosome at this stage is identified with Indra and Agni of the Vedas. It corresponds to Indra if it lies outside the Nucleus and to Agni if inside and we shall see how far the Vedic description of these gods agrees with the character of the Centrosome at this stage.

In this connection we might observe that Vishnu and Vayu are the Vedic originals of the Vedanta system of thought, while the system of Yoga is based on Agni and Indra, and this will be explained in a subsequent chapter. Indeed, as we shall see, all the great systems of Hindu philosophy are based on the character of a pair of Vedic gods, and they in their turn correspond to the character of the Centrosome or the Nucleus at different stages of cell development; and so, as the cell is a miniature of Brahmanda or the universe, they personify eternal forces of life at play, and it is this that is the subject matter of the sacred books of the Hindus composed in different forms.

INDRA: Indra represents the Centrosome characterised by heat or radial energy which, like the Vishnu Centrosome, lies outside the Nucleus, in the cytoplasm. We shall see how far his Vedic description and the character of the Centrosome at this stage agree.

VEDIC GODS EXPLANATION THE CELL
Indra is a Buddhi god, and is associated with Mind and the twofold character of Ether. We have explained that Buddhi corresponds to heat, Mind to electric energy, and the twofold character of Ether is magnetic, with its two poles in terms of the cell this means that the Centrosome, charged with heat (Indra), is associated with (or transformed into) electric and magnetic energy. The Centrosome is charged with radial energy which, in the course of cell development becomes electric and then magnetic.
Dyaus is the father of Indra. Dyaus, as we have explained, refers to Purushic Ether, or Ether with a south-seeking magnetic pole, corresponding to which we have the senses of knowledge.
Then we have pointed out that when the two daughter cells are formed out of the old mother cell, the Nucleus is originally charged with north-seeking, and the cytoplasm with south-seeking magnetic pole; and then they absorb the induced negative super-electric energy of the Centrosome, and become negatively super-electric themselves.
Thus we might say that Dyaus refers to the cytoplasm, and his counterpart, Prthvi, to the Nucleus.
Hence Dyaus, as the father of Indra, refers to the "birthplace" or location of the Indra-Centrosome, viz. within the cytoplasm; and we have pointed out that Indra may be identified with the Centrosome, charged with radial energy and situated outside the Nucleus, that is, in the cytoplasm.
The Centrosome, possessed of radial energy, is sometimes seen to lie in the cytoplasm, outside, though in the neighbourhood of the Nucleus.
Indra is associated with Heart-energy. We have explained that Heart-energy is super-electric, while Indra represents Buddhi or heat. This means that heat is associated with super-electric energy; and we have explained that, the two are, for practical purposes, alike, and it is for this reason that the soul (Heart energy) and Buddhi (Sun energy or heat) are often identified. The Centrosome is characterised by radial energy (heat and light).
Indra and Vishnu are great friend Indra wishes to become like Vishnu, but is persuaded to desist. This has already been explained in connection with the idea of Vishnu. This has already been explained.
Indra and Varuna are great friends, and are practically alike. But ultimately Indra is accepted in preference to Varuna. Varuna refers to the fluid part of the Nucleus and the Nucleolus, charged with negative super-electric energy; while Indra is the Centrosome charged with heat or radial energy. We have explained that super-electric energy, whether positive or negative, is closely akin to heat; hence Indra (heat) and Varuna (negative super-electric energy) are great friends and practically alike.
But the activity of the Centrosome is regarded as greater than that of the Nucleus, and the development of the cell is due more to the action of the former than the latter Hence Indra is preferred to Varuna.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection between the Sankhya and Yoga systems, based on the Vedic idea of Varuna and Indra respectively. They are in some respects alike, but Yoga is ultimately to be preferred.
The Nucleus has a negative super-electric charge, while the Centrosome is radial in character.
Indra and Vayu are great friends. Indra is Buddhi or heat, while Vayu is Prana or breath, and this gives us the connection between the two.
In terms of the cell this means that the Indra Centrosome, charged with heat and situated in the cytoplasm, has a great deal in common with the same Centrosome when it is charged with super-electric energy (Vayu Centrosome).
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection between Buddhi (Indra) and Prana-Vayu), and the corresponding systems, viz., Yoga and Vedanta, based on the Vedic idea of these gods. They are said to be great friends and, as in the case of Indra and Vishnu, almost alike.
The Centrosome is super-electric at first, and then it becomes radial in character.
Indra and Agni are great friends, and closely associated together a number of Vedic hymns are addressed jointly to them. Both Indra and Agni represent the Centrosome as characterised by radial energy or heat the only difference between them is that the former is to be seen outside and the latter inside the Nucleus. As they are characterised by the same energy, they are practically identical and so a number of Vedic hymns are addressed jointly to them. The Centrosome, charged with radial energy, may sometimes be seen within; and sometimes outside the Nucleus.
Indra slays Vrtra by means of his thunderbolt. This has already been explained. It means that the serpent-like fibrillar mass of the Nucleus (Vrtra) is broken into segments (slain) by means of the electro-magnetic energy (thunderbolt) of the Centrosome, originally charged with radial energy (Indra). The serpent-like aggregated mass of the Nucleus is broken into segments, called chromosomes, under the action of the Centrosome charged with radial energy.
Indra is a doer of many deeds and performs many sacrifices. This means that the Indra Centrosome is very active in character.
Sacrifice, as we have explained, is a creative activity; and so this means that the activity of the Indra-Centrosome is creative, and results in the development of the cell.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the character of Buddhi in the Yoga system of thought, which too refers to Indra. Buddhi Yoga in thus characterized by action which is creative.
The Centrosome charged with radial energy is active in character, and its activity results in the development of the cell.
Indra drinks Soma, and thereby performs his wonderful deeds. He is sometimes identified with Soma. Soma is Mind or electric energy, and refers to the Centrosome as being electric in character.
In terms of the cell this means that the Centrosome, charged with radial energy (Indra), becomes electric, and it is then that its activity is at its highest. The Centrosome, as radial, and again as electric, has almost the same character, and so Indra and Soma are identified.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection between Buddhi (Indra) and Mind (Soma). They have a number of common characteristics, Buddhi is transformed into Mind, and it is then that it is most active.
The Centrosome, charged with radial energy, becomes electric in the process of cell development, and acts on the Nucleus. Its action is practically similar to what it is when it is characterized by heat.
The two Asvins are Indra's friends, and store up his energy for him, Indra is also associated with cows and horses. The two Asvins, as well as cows and horses, refer to the twofold character of Ether, with two magnetic poles, and the senses of knowledge and action correspond to them.
In terms of the cell this means that the Indra Centrosome, charged with heat, after becoming electric (associated with Soma), becomes magnetic and develops two magnetic poles (Asvins, cows and horses) It then divides into two.
In terms of Philosophy this gives us the connection between Buddhi (Indra) and the senses of knowledge and action (Asvins, horses and cows), Buddhi functions not only through the mind, but through the senses too, and so the two Asvins store up the energy of Indra. The sense of knowledge and action are twins, that is they are created simultaneously.
The Centrosome appears to be characterised by radial energy at first, and then it becomes magnetic in the process of cell development; and finally it divides into two halves.
Indra separates the two world halves, and joins them together again. The two world halves, or Heaven and Earth, as we have explained, refer to the Nucleus and the cytoplasm of the cell. This means that the Indra Centrosome keeps the two apart, and yet tends to join them together. In other words, when this Centrosome acts on the Nucleus, the nuclear membrane, which divides The Nucleus from the cytoplasm, tends to disappear, but it does not actually do so at this stage.
As the two world halves also refer to Purusha and Prakrti, or God and Nature, in terms of Philosophy this means that in the Yoga system, based on the Indra idea, the two are conceived as separate entities, and yet they tend to merge into one.
When the Centrosome, charged with radial energy, acts on the Nucleus, the nuclear membrane tends to disappear, but does not actually do so at this stage. It disappears when the Centrosome becomes electric, and then magnetic.
The three goddesses, Bharati, Ida, and Sarasvati help and strengthen Indra. As we have explained, the three goddesses refer to the three aspects of Nature or Prakrti, Heart or super-electric energy (Sarasvati), Mind energy (Ida), and Ether (Bharati). Prakrti in the cell is the Nucleus, and so we have these energies associated with the Nucleus; and in the case of the idea of Varuna, who represents the fluid part of the Nucleus, we have seen that the latter contains all of them.
In connection with Indra this means that the Centrosome, charged with radial energy, is associated with and acts upon the Nucleus which is characterised by all these energies.
In terms o Philosophy this means that Prakrti or Nature in the Yoga system of thought, based on the Indra-idea, is regarded as creative (the goddesses); but Buddhi, the chief creative energy of life in this system (Indra), is conceived as supreme, and it is strengthened by the energy of Prakrti or Nature.
The Nucleus is characterized by super-electric, electric, and magnetic energies; and of these the super-electric energy is, for practical purposes, similar to heat. The Centrosome, with its radial energy, acts on the Nucleus, and the latter reacts to it.

Thus we see that Indra represents the universal Centrosome or God characterized by Buddhi, Sun-energy or Heat (tapas) As this Centrosome is situated outside the Nucleus, so is this idea of God distinct from that of Nature or Prakrti; but it finds all necessary support from different forms of the manifest universe (the three goddesses), and the two tend to be merged into one (world halves) This idea of God, though based on Buddhi, is yet associated with Heart-energy, conceived as Purushic, Prakrtic, or Purushic and Prakrtic both (Vishnu, Varuna, and Vayu). Then we are told that Buddhi is transformed into Mind, as heat into electric energy (Soma); and then into the senses of knowledge and action, as electric into magnetic energy (Asvins) As the Centrosome, charged with heat, acts on the Nucleus, even so does Indra, the Buddhi-God on the universe, and thereby, like the segments of the cell, called chromosomes, the different parts of the world become manifest.

AGNI: Agni represents the same Centrosome as Indra only it is seen to lie within the Nucleus and not outside it. We shall see how far the Vedic description of Agni agrees with the character of the Centrosome charged with radial energy.

VEDIC GODS EXPLANATION THE CELL
Agni personifies Buddhi. In terms of the cell this means that the Centrosome is characterised by heat or radial energy. The Centrosome is characterised by radial energy.
He is a child of the Waters and lives in the Waters. Water refers to the fluid part of the Nucleus, and this means that the Agni Centrosome lies in the Nucleus. The Centrosome charged with radial energy may be seen to lie in the Nucleus.
Agni is an Asura. An Asura, as we have explained, refers to negative super-electric energy (Heart energy) as Prakrtic; and that is the energy of the Nucleus. This means, therefore, that the Agni Centrosome is closely associated with or situated in the Nucleus. In this case it is sometimes said to arise from the Nucleus itself, and so Agni is said to be an Asura. The Centrosome, characterised by radial energy, may lie in the Nucleus; and then it may be said to reside in or to arise from the Nucleus.
He is a Serpent, called Ahi. The Serpent, as we have explained in the case of Vrtra, refers to the fibrillar part of the Nucleus; and this means that the Agni Centrosome lies sometimes in this part of the Nucleus, and so is identified with it. This Centrosome may sometimes be seen to lie in the fibrillar part of the Nucleus. Sometimes it is said to arise from the Nucleus.
Agni is a friend of Indra and many Vedic hymns are addressed jointly to them. This has been explained in connection with Indra. This has already been explained.
Agni and Soma are a mighty pair Soma is pressed specially for Agni. Agni is the guardian of the Soma juice. Soma, as has been pointed out, refers to the Centrosome as electric, and his connection with the Indra Centrosome has already been explained. As the Agni Centrosome is practically the same as the Indra Centrosome, the connection between Agni and Soma is almost the same as between Indra and Soma. This means that the Agni Centrosome, charged with heat, becomes electric in the process of cell development. The Centrosome charged with radial energy becomes electric in the process of cell development.
Agni slays Vrtra. Vrtra is the fibrillar, serpent-like mass of the Nucleus, and this means that the Agni Centrosome acts on this mass and breaks it up into chromosomes. The Centrosome acts on the fibrillar, serpent like mass of the Nucleus, and breaks it up into segments called chromosomes.
Agni is associated with cows and horses. Cows and horses, as has been explained, refer to the twofold character of Ether with its two magnetic poles; and the explanation is the same as in the case of Indra's association with them. It means that, the Centrosome becomes magnetic in the process of cell development, and is broken into two halves. The Centrosome becomes magnetic in the process of cell development, and is divided into two halves, each with an opposite magnetic pole.

Thus we see that Agni represents, in terms of Brahmanda, or the universal Cell, the Centrosome, Purusha, or God, characterised by Buddhi, Sun-energy, or heat (tapas) He is situated within the Nucleus or Prakrti (Nature), and, in conjunction with it, creates the universe. This is another aspect of the Yoga system of thought, based on the Agni idea, in which God and Nature or Purusha and Prakti are more closely allied than in the Indra idea. The Agni idea of Yoga is more dualistic, and the Indra idea more monistic, in character; and we shall see the point of this difference in the course of these pages. As in the case of Indra, the Buddhi of Agni is associated with the energy of the Heart, Mind, and the twofold character of Ether; and, acting on the unformed material of the universe, makes it manifest in its different forms, even as the Centrosome breaks up the fibrillar part of the Nucleus into chromosomes.